Micah Challenge Australia Blog

 

The Micah Challenge blog is a space for discussion and debate about the issues of global poverty, faith, advocacy and justice and the Millennium Development Goals. This blog aims to provoke thought and challenge you to learn more about the issues discussed. We welcome your comments.

Micah Challenge is a global campaign of Christians speaking out against poverty and injustice. Click here to visit the Micah Challenge website.

  • A very precious 5th birthday!

    Posted by Eliza

    10 November, 2011

    I’d been hearing about this birthday party for weeks – my little friend Lol Lol’s bunny rabbit themed 5th birthday. Lol had been looking forward to this day since her party guests left her 4th birthday party and every time she told me about it, she beamed. A bunny rabbit invitation had been sent out, designed by Lol herself and her clever mum had baked the Women’s Day bunny rabbit birthday cake that Lol had chosen. A no-doubt nervous little bunny was even invited to the party, to be ‘gently’ patted and cuddled by Lol’s party guests. Yesterday Micah Challenge shared video on their Facebook page about a deadly disease that claims the lives of more children under five than AIDS, measles and malaria combined: As I watched the horrifying statistics flash across the screen, Lol lol came to mind and I felt a sting. A few years ago, my little friend Lol was really sick. The normally loud and energetic Lol had become subdued. She spent hours on the couch, too tired to go outside or play. After a few days of thinking she had… read more

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  • Biblical politics

    Posted by Nils

    8 November, 2011

    Sojourners recently posted a great blog on biblical politics by American theologian, Jim Wallis. The comment that stood out to me was: “If you work with and for the poor, you inevitably run into injustice. In other words, poverty isn’t caused by accident. There are unjust systems and structures that create and perpetuate poverty and human suffering. And service alone is never enough; working to change both the attitudes and institutional arrangements that cause poverty is required.” I remember a story a former colleague told once about when his small group watched the movie Bruce Almighty in which the main character gets to play God for a day. The small group discussed what they would do if they had the opportunity to be God for a day, and the main response was that they would redistribute all the wealth in the world so that everyone had the same. But then came the comment that the next day things would be unequal again because of systems that are in place that perpetuate inequality. Thus the need for justice and changing structures, and not… read more

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  • Hope for Creation

    Posted by Micah Challenge

    2 November, 2011

    By Cath James, Environmental Project Officer at Justice & International Mission Recently I read that The Bureau of Meteorology recorded some of the highest temperatures on record for September. I was shocked. Not because it surprised me, but because I realised I had stopped thinking about the fact that our world is still warming and this will have all sorts of consequences for how we live our lives. I can’t cope with bad news all the time, none of us can. It is only natural that we develop some form of coping mechanism to deal with such a huge threat as climate change. Some people choose to discount the risk or choose to be sceptical, others go into denial. At times this has been my response. Sometimes I stop reading newspaper articles that will tell me about another report with further scientific evidence of human induced climate change, or about the impact on people in the Pacific who are struggling to grow food because their croplands are now salty with increased flooding and kingtides. Instead I have found myself thinking, ‘Surely if it was… read more

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  • Just the way it's always been

    Posted by Amanda

    31 October, 2011

    Leaders of the biggest economies in the world will meet in France later this week to discuss (and try to resolve) some big financial issues. The G20 will bring together leaders from 19 nations (plus the EU) who together represent 90% of the world’s GDP, 80% of the world’s trade and 66% of the world’s population. Fears about the health of the U.S. and European economies will inevitably be at the top of the political and media agenda. Of course, private meetings between bureaucrats and Ministers have been going on for months now to decide what the leaders will agree when they jet into Cannes. And in that lengthy process of negotiation and compromise, ideals inevitably get watered down – it’s a matter of what can be achieved much more than what should be achieved. In the 2005 film, “The Girl in the Café”, about an imaginary G20-type meeting, Lawrence, a consummate bureaucrat confesses, “We get into the habit of compromising and therefore we are always compromised.” President Sarkozy, who will… read more

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