Micah Challenge Australia Blog

 

The Micah Challenge blog is a space for discussion and debate about the issues of global poverty, faith, advocacy and justice and the Millennium Development Goals. This blog aims to provoke thought and challenge you to learn more about the issues discussed. We welcome your comments.

Micah Challenge is a global campaign of Christians speaking out against poverty and injustice. Click here to visit the Micah Challenge website.

  • Celebrating International Day of People with Disabilities

    Posted by Stevie

    2 December, 2011

    The way I see it, living with cerebral palsy has given me opportunities to rise to the challenges I face. Living in Australia, I have a walking frame, wheelchair, and an aide called a ‘keyguard’, which assists my typing. Provided with assistance, I was able to go through primary and secondary mainstream schools. Growing up I had physio, speech and occupational therapy, all of which helped me to develop my physical abilities. My immediate and extended family are extremely supportive, encouraging me to do all that I can for myself, and assisting me when needed. I have developed my writing, public speaking and pastoral skills, studied a Diploma in Counselling Studies and enjoy dear friendships – everything I need to lead a rich and fulfilling life. I have been given opportunities and empowerment to be all that I can be... All that I was born to be. But if I had been born into poverty, my life would have been very different. Without a walking frame, or wheelchair, I would crawl along the ground. As a small child, I would have been reliant on my… read more

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  • Who are the 'Joneses'?

    Posted by Micah Challenge

    29 November, 2011

    Like so many of our friends and neighbours, we sometimes find ourselves comparing our lives to those of others. And most often, we look at those who make more and have more than we do. As the old adage says, we look to “the Joneses.” But who are the Joneses really? Consider this: If you make $43,500 a year, you’re in the top 12% of earners in the world.That’s right. The world. So maybe we should turn this whole Jones thing around. 88% of the world is comparing itself to you … and me. WE are “the Joneses” to 88% of people on this planet. And yet, where do we most often look for comparison? The other 11%! I’m not saying we should compare at all. We shouldn’t. Life is about much more than material things. But, just for a moment, let’s entertain this thought of keeping up with the proverbial family. •If you make more than $2 a day, you are the Joneses to 1.2 billion people. •If you have a warm bed to sleep in at night, you are the Joneses to the billions who are sleeping on cold,… read more

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  • My little friend Langtham

    Posted by Stevie

    21 November, 2011

    Meeting Langtham was a very special moment in my life. He is one year old and lives in Lusaka, Zambia. Langtham has cerebral palsy ... as do I. From vastly different parts of the world, we shared a few minutes together. More than that, we share the way our bodies work. Here's a video about the day I met Langtham: After I came home to Australia, I wrote this poem, holding dear my encounter with him: Dear Langthammy little friendthe meeting of our livesthat moment in timemy heart has framedToo young to remember meyou will always be rememberedDiversityin our ethnicity, territory, opportunitiesthe world between usa commonality we share –not an unfortunate afflictionnor some spiritual retributionNo, our bodies dance to a different beatour tongues, to a different tuneYour song, is beautifulYour eyes are as richas the soil from whichlife springs and takes rootMay your life be poetryspeaking the deeper truthMay your heart be warmedby your mother’s loveas your skin is warmedby the sunMay you treasure, nurturethe space between mother and sonMay friends… read more

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  • Glimmers of Hope

    Posted by Micah Challenge

    15 November, 2011

    On a recent trip to Cambodia, I ventured an hour outside Phnom Penh to visit a project of the National Centre for Disabled Persons (NCDP). The trip itself told a story. Leaving from the centre of Phnom Penh we drove on well surfaced roads past well constructed and large buildings – offices, government ministries, restaurants and homes. The further we got from the city the more run down the roads and housing became, until we were on dirt roads pockmarked with deep holes and bordered by small, shoddy timber and iron houses on stilts. The contrast between the wealth and poverty in this country was vividly displayed. Arriving at an obviously poor, rural community we drove through the gates of a local school. Alighting the van we were shown into a classroom where a dozen or so severely disabled children sat at desks. A 15 year old girl with a twisted body and intellectual difficulties grinned mischievously as she wheeled it into the teacher; a curly headed girl with a broad grin concentrated on a puzzle; three boys with intellectual difficulties and twisted… read more

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