Micah Challenge Australia Blog

 

The Micah Challenge blog is a space for discussion and debate about the issues of global poverty, faith, advocacy and justice and the Millennium Development Goals. This blog aims to provoke thought and challenge you to learn more about the issues discussed. We welcome your comments.

Micah Challenge is a global campaign of Christians speaking out against poverty and injustice. Click here to visit the Micah Challenge website.

  • Hillsong Mobilises the Masses for Justice

    Posted by Matthew

    4 July, 2013

    Matt Anslow, National Young Adults' Coordinator for TEAR Australia, shares his experience of volunteering with Micah Challenge at Hillsong Conference 2013. Hillsong has not been without its detractors. Every few months, almost like clockwork, you can expect some media outlet to have provided the latest exposé. To be sure, as Australia’s largest church, Hillsong is an easy target for antagonists, including some other Christians. But for all the complications of being so large and so visible, there is also the incredible potential for Hillsong to contribute meaningfully to fighting poverty. And so here I am, writing from Hillsong Conference 2013, where I join other fantastic Micah Challenge volunteers as we engage conference-goers with the reality of global poverty and the Christian mandate to love and do justice. This year Hillsong has chosen to partner with Micah Challenge to encourage its attendees to think about what it means to advocate for the poor. That it has decided to partner with Micah Challenge is a clear sign that Hillsong has a… read more

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  • Leaders map way to take global development beyond 2015

    Posted by Amanda

    6 June, 2013

    The leaders of three very different nations, Indonesia, the UK and Liberia (as well as an army of advisors) have been meeting over the last nine months to discuss what the world might want to aim for in the next generation. At the moment we have the Millennium Development Goals which Micah Challenge campaigns around, but what happens after 2015? That’s what the High Level Panel has addressed in its report to the UN. It set out its ideas on a post 2015 global development agenda after hearing from thousands of people and groups. The report builds on the MDGs in many ways but goes beyond them. It wants to ‘eradicate’ extreme poverty and it urges the world to embrace sustainable development with social, economic and environmental dimensions. It puts women and youth at the heart of the picture and talks about the importance of peace and good governance. It weaves human rights throughout the report and importantly it wants any future goals to be universal – so they apply to Australia as much as Timor Leste and Brazil. And perhaps unexcitedly it… read more

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  • Will aid be a priority at the next election?

    Posted by Jennifer

    2 April, 2013

    If you were to ask 20 average Australians to give you a list of their top 5 priorities when it comes to making a decision to vote, how often would foreign aid gain a mention? Having done this very experiment informally myself over recent weeks, I have quickly discovered that education, child care, jobs, immigration policy and other domestic priorities very quickly fill up this list for most people. Climate change policy may feature somewhere around number 4 or 5 for those who have an environmental inclination, but in very few cases will foreign affairs get a mention, let alone foreign aid. It is true that foreign aid currently accounts for only 1.5% of Government expenditure, so why should it be a priority? I would argue that in terms of its capacity to save lives and increase the quality of life for hundreds of thousands of people around the world, this money is some of the most important of all Government expenditure. With a Federal election scheduled for September 14th, Micah Challenge is committed to placing foreign aid high on the agenda of policy… read more

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  • Driven to action - Scott's pledge to Finish the Race

    Posted by Scott

    27 March, 2013

    It’s official. There are now more overweight people in the world than undernourished. According to the World Health Organisation, in 2008, more than 1.4 billion adults, 20 and older, were overweight. I am one of them. Ok, I prefer to think of it as pleasantly plump, but however I describe it, I find it disturbing that in a world with such plenty 868 million people don’t have enough to eat. Statistics like this are not only disturbing; they drive many to despair, to throw their hands in the air and sigh at the intractability of the problem. They have the opposite effect on me. They drive me to action, because I believe the situation can change. Take undernourishment. In 1990 there were just on a billion hungry people in the world. In the 20 years since then the world population has grown by 1.5 billion, mostly in poorer countries, yet the number of undernourished people has declined by more than 100 million. And the trends are all in the right direction, whether you’re thinking income poverty, child mortality, or kids in school. I was in… read more

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