Micah Challenge Australia Blog

 

The Micah Challenge blog is a space for discussion and debate about the issues of global poverty, faith, advocacy and justice and the Millennium Development Goals. This blog aims to provoke thought and challenge you to learn more about the issues discussed. We welcome your comments.

Micah Challenge is a global campaign of Christians speaking out against poverty and injustice. Click here to visit the Micah Challenge website.

  • The trouble with politics

    Posted by Amanda

    24 November, 2011

    The trouble is that politicians are always looking to the next poll, the next election, the next emergency solution rather than making brave long-term and sustainable decisions. It’s often called the 'Eisenhower Principle' after his saying: "What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important." So earlier this month in Cannes, when leaders of all the major economies in the world gathered for the G20, short-term interventions to fix the urgent Eurozone crisis sucked the air and media attention from innovative important ideas. Greece, a nation of 11 million people, has managed to distract and frustrate G20 leaders. I wonder if other nations of 11 million outside Europe would have the same ability to attract bailout money of €200 billion / AU$275 billion (this is the total promised by the 2010 bailout and the latest package). Chad, Guinea and Tunisia all have a similar population but their poverty, their debt and their challenges go largely ignored. Haiti, a country with a population about the same as that of… read more

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  • Child of the 80s

    Posted by Elissa

    25 October, 2011

    I’ll admit it: I’m a child of the 80s. I’ve got fond memories of Expo 88, and I can still sing the theme songs of She-Ra, Inspector Gadget, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Smurfs. Punky Brewster was my hero. I owned a hypercolour t-shirt, and I wore it tucked into my “happy pants”—think everything you’ve ever seen of MC Hammer, but on a five-year-old. It’s funny how the 80s legacy lives on, for better or worse. I got more than a little bit excited when Cold Chisel announced their comeback tour this year, and I’ll always have be fascinated by Rubik’s Cubes. And it seems my mum was right when she told me that fashions always go in cycles—although I just can’t bring myself to embrace high-waisted jeans a second time. But it’s not just clothes that seem to have cycled around again. One of the defining characteristics of the 80s was the “greed is good” mantra that infiltrated consumer psyches across the Western world. It’s no coincidence that one of the most… read more

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  • Confronting?

    Posted by Erica

    13 September, 2011

    My home page on my computer is The Guardian Global Development site. This is the kind of world news I really value, focusing on global development. Much of what I encounter and read daily sticks in my mind and is something I carry with me in my heart. I cannot read about global challenges and injustice without my heart being affected. Recently, I viewed images of what unsafe water and poor sanitation looks like in Uganda. I feel confronted and challenged by these images. We were in Uganda earlier this year, so I when I looked at these images I pictured the places that we walked around and the people that we met there. But also I think of India, and of all the people who live without a toilet. I remember the smell and the shock of seeing communal open toilets. I think of the toilets we have used when travelling, and yet how much better it is to have horrible toilet than none at all. Globally, 2.6 billion people live without access to a safe toilet, while almost 1 billion don't have clean, safe water. The WHO estimates that 10% of the global disease burden… read more

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  • Faith decorates East Africa with flowers

    Posted by Micah

    25 August, 2011

    Stories of hope - How the funds raised by Micah Challenge endorsing agencies are making a real difference on the ground in East Africa.Makeshift shelters pitched in a dusty desert landscape. Newly-arrived refugees from Somalia for whom survival is the immediate priority. This is the reality for Faith Kagwiria (pictured below), lead social worker at Hagadera, one of the three camps in the Dadaab complex, which is managed by the Lutheran World Federation (LWF). Kawgiria has worked here for more than two years. The massive influx of refugees meant her team was recently expanded to help deal with the emergency. Kagwiria's hundreds of home visits have made her a familiar figure around the camp and its outskirts. Face of hope
 "The refugees call me 'Face' instead of 'Faith'," she says, smiling. "At a recent leaders meeting I was described as 'the one who decorates the camp with white flowers' -in reference to all the tents I have distributed to those who would otherwise sleep under trees." To join her and some of the team on a daily round is to see the… read more

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