Micah Challenge Australia Blog

 

The Micah Challenge blog is a space for discussion and debate about the issues of global poverty, faith, advocacy and justice and the Millennium Development Goals. This blog aims to provoke thought and challenge you to learn more about the issues discussed. We welcome your comments.

Micah Challenge is a global campaign of Christians speaking out against poverty and injustice. Click here to visit the Micah Challenge website.

  • Let's finish what we started

    Posted by John

    13 November, 2012

    All of us have jobs that we leave unfinished that are the source of much frustration. All of us have to-do lists that never seem to get done. But some things just shouldn’t be left unfinished. In the year 2000 we committed to achieving eight Millennium Development Goals in order to halve poverty by 2015. These goals included reducing the number of kids dying before their fifth birthday by 2/3, reducing the number of mothers dying in childbirth by ¾, and halving the number of people without access to a toilet. We committed to ‘spare no effort’ to free people from extreme poverty. Some things are worth finishing. Micah Challenge’s Finish the Race campaign is an invitation to all Christians in this country to make sure that we don’t leave the job of halving global poverty by 2015 unfinished. There is too much at stake to let this slip down the to-do list. Finish the Race is an opportunity to work together as the body of Christ to address poverty and injustice because we believe poverty is contrary to God’s desire… read more

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  • Absolute power + absolute love = God's equation for justice

    Posted by Amanda

    19 October, 2012

    “If absolute power corrupts absolutely, and God has absolute power, isn’t God absolutely corrupt?” I was in a meeting in Delhi recently, talking about poverty and corruption when Rev Richard Howell, head of the evangelical churches network in India (EFI) asked that question. And the answer he gave? God combines absolute power with absolute love. Where there is sacrificial and unselfish love, power is transformed. And when individuals and society seek after the power of money and influence without love, corruption sets in. In its broadest sense, corruption is moral impurity or deviation from the ideal. It is the opposite of honesty and honour. How do everyday followers of Jesus rate on the corruption index? Maybe not very well. Lots of us are guilty of staying quiet when we see financial wrongdoing at work, some of us might indulge in a bit of petty corruption on the grounds that everyone else is doing it, some of us may not even think about integrity at the work place. For some of us, paying a bribe so our sick child can receive medicines is a… read more

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  • Finish Well

    Posted by Micah Challenge

    9 October, 2012

    Almost a month on from Voices for Justice, Courtney Gavin, Baptist World Aid's Production and Marketing Coordinator, reflects on finishing the race to halve extreme poverty by 2015. If I could describe Voices for Justice 2012 in three words, they would be: amazing; encouraging; motivating. But perhaps I should start at the beginning. My advocacy began as a teenager. Enraged by global poverty and wanting to do something about it, I discovered Micah Challenge and quickly enlisted by signing the ‘Micah Call’. But when I realised this advocacy might actually mean having enough guts to talk to my local federal MP, I have to admit…I was kind of freaked out. So ‘X’ amount of years later, here I am at Voices for Justice for a second time (slowly overcoming my fears), this time as a lobby group leader…no pressure!! My lobby group met with one MP, one Senator and two advisors to a politician. We asked them to recommit to increasing aid to 0.5% GNI by 2016 (and a timetabled commitment of 0.7% by 2020), to ensure effective… read more

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  • Reflections on Voices for Justice

    Posted by Josh

    26 September, 2012

    Well, the Micah Challenge’s Voices for Justice conference is over for another a year, and I thought I might offer just a few reflections on what we did while we were in Canberra for the four incredible days. Though the quality of the teaching sessions, the general reality of our diversity in unity, and the important meetings with (over 100!) MPs are obviously very important to note (and great to take part in), I thought I’d take a step back and look at some of the larger themes. The conference this year centred, basically, around two main points: 1) Firstly, it was noted very clearly that we need to celebrate the progress that has already been made towards reaching the Millennium Development Goals by 2015. For me, this was such an incredibly important part of the whole conference. Though it is true that we still have a long way to go in some instances (and I’ll get to that below), I believe that it’s essential to celebrate the progress that has been achieved. When dealing with issues of poverty and social justice, it’s… read more

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